Outdoor creativity

The outdoors is my creative space. I’m not sure if it’s because of nature inspiring me or because hiking stimulates my mind. It’s likely a combination of both.

Writing

Ever since I started walking outside on my own as kind in my parents’ cow pastures, I found the experience enlightening. A lot of times I think out story ideas and put them to paper. I haven’t published any of these, but you might see something in the near future.

I have also written a poem inspired by nature and how it offers peace. I layered with the scariness of cancer and compared it to a dirty city.

Where the Prarie Meets the Sky

Cankered walls of urban blight,

Doors of other’s lives closed and boarded.

Trapped in my own barred cell,

My dreams and future disregarded.

Dreams, where the prairie meets the sky,

Rolling mountains, benign tumors

kept safe by the Snake River,

Winding around in health and humor.

Sitting in the dark and damp,

my heart longs more

for gentle Ticklegrasses that caress

my cheek while swaying in warm air

Running barefoot through the plains

straight to water’s edge,

Looking for a pale mutated face,

Instead a smiling, friendly sketch

And a sudden splash from salmon,

The river thrives and provides

healthy growth seen in the tallest conifers and aspens,

Bringing life to my insides.

Mule deer and rabbits graze,

Growth where it is supposed to be,

encouraged by the compassionate sun,

Never scourged by acute disease.

Pulled away from the harmless world

I relapse into the state I’m in,

The reality of my evil plague,

There is no remission.

Photography

I’ve also thought of art ideas. One of the more obvious ways to express art in the outdoors is through photography. I love to have a camera when I’m hiking. Since I graduated high school I’ve used a Nikon D3000.

Since moving to Wyoming one of my favorite photography subjects has been the Indian Paintbrush. I’m fascinated how it grows in both desert and alpine climates and how it looks different in those two environments.

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I also love the landscape of Wyoming and have taken many pictures. It’s been fun to use my camera in manual mode and learn different techniques, like depth of field and shutter speeds as well as adjusting ISO.

 

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Painting

This summer I tried a new experience, painting outside. In the past my paintings have consisted of acrylic and replicas of animal pictures I found on the internet. Last winter I picked up watercolors for the first time since high school and found my love for the medium. I love how the water reacts with the paints, and you’re never one hundred percent how it’ll turn out.

Once I find a medium I also start following several Instagram accounts of artists to learn skills and techniques. One watercolor artist is Nikki Frumkin, who operates the drawntohighplaces account. Nikki lives in Seattle and often paints Mt. Rainier as well as many other mountain landscapes. One of my favorite things about Nikki is that she paints her landscapes while she’s actually there. She’s so dedicated to her art, she even goes out in the cold winter months. I recommend everybody follow her on Instagram to see how the paints freezes on the pages. Check out her website too and you’ll see her prints, calendar and stickers.

Being inspired by her method, I decided that I was going to start painting outside too. It’s a unique experience that gave me a new appreciation for the wild places I visit. I searched the landscape and enjoyed every piece of it instead of focusing on my trail and what was ahead of me. The experience helped me realize details I was oblivious too months before. It also gave me new purpose in protecting the lands I love because I noticed every beetle killed tree spotting the landscape.

Tips and tools for getting started:

53287794_486006698884826_3313731186290851840_n– For my birthday my boyfriend got me water brush pens. These allow you to bring your brushes anywhere. You don’t have to worry about using your drinking water supply for carrying an extra water container. The water sits in the brush handle and is ready at the squeeze of the handle.

– My boyfriend also got me a travel mixing palette that I filled with greens, blues and browns. Mine has ten wells and a slot for a pen or pencil.

– You’ll also want a small watercolor notebook. I got mine from Mossery. Mossery is a Malaysian company. It sells planners, sketchbooks, notebooks and other stationary supplies. My sketchbook has a cardboard type outside that I had personalized with my name with 28 sheets of watercolor paper.

– You can also pack a paper towel or some other material to soak up excess water. It’s also nice to have so you can switch colors without changing brushes or ending up with muddied paints.

– One of my first tips for getting started is to not get discouraged. I wasn’t thrilled with my first painting as you’ll see further down, but I’m proud of my second one. Painting what you see in real time is difficult and takes practice.

– Use nature as a tool. I don’t mean as your subject, but explore how the elements can influence your art. As I mentioned earlier, the Drawn To High Places art has cool examples of how watercolor reacts to freezing temperatures. Let dust react with your work. See how the breeze at the top of the mountain affects your work.

– The next is actually a tip from Nikki Frumkin. If you paint in freezing temperatures, use vodka with your paints instead of water.

My experience:

53752183_503744573364966_978161690514292736_nMy first venture with the watercolor journal was on Kennaday Peak in the Medicine Bow National Forest on August 11th. I am a part of the Platte Valley Jaycees, and we were hosting our annual Snowy Range Duathlon. It’s a biking and hiking/running race that starts near the Lincoln Park Campground, summits Kennaday Peak and ends back at the starting point.

I volunteered to station the summit with the intent to try watercolor painting outside for the first time. Once I got to the summit I picked out a rock that would allow me to get a view of the landscape and keep an eye on the racers.

The sky was smoky that day from the Badger Creek Fire that was burning about 60 miles away. This resulted in a hazy mountain background that I attempted to capture in my painting.

I’m not a huge fan of the painting that came from this excursion, but I didn’t let it discourage me.

 

The next time I brought my watercolor painting outside was a little more than a month later. In Carbon County there is a famous grove of aspen trees called Aspen Alley. Fall enthusiasts can find this treasure traveling west of Encampment on Highway 70. Travel about 25 miles to Deep Creek Road, which is Forest Road 801. From there, travel north for .8 miles.

I went on September 29th. The trees are often in full color by this time, but this past fall many still had green leaves.

I picked a spot off the size of the road to do my painting. To keep the paper from buckling, I used painters tape to hold about five sheets together.

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First I sketched in the trees with a pen. Then I moved to the paints starting with the road and then filling in the trees. The sky and background mountain were last. I’ll admit I took creative liberties, but I liked the outcome. The cool part about this painting is that many cars were driving past me, stirring up dirt from the gravel road. I can still feel the dirt when I run my hand over the page.

With these two paintings under my belt, I’m excited to get back outside with my watercolors. Sitting outside in the cold freezing my hands off isn’t my idea fun, so I’ll leave the winter outdoor art to @Drawntohighplaces. My outdoor art will have to wait until the spring. I learned a new technique to paint deciduous trees, so I’ll return to aspen alley or travel someplace in the Midwest.

 

Here are two paintings inspired by the outdoors but were completed inside.

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Encampment Bighorn Sheep Capture

0120_sheep capture (1)Two weekends ago I joined Wyoming Game and Fish as they captured five bighorn sheep near the Encampment River. The state agency partnered with Native Range Capture Services which originated in New Zealand. The company works with many agencies in Canada, Mexico and the United States.

Another bighorn sheep capture took place last February. At that time Game and Fish collared five ewes. Over the weekend, the mugging crew caught the same sheep, so they could receive new collars.

Saratoga Game and Fish Biologist Teal Cufaude said the sheep needed new collars because the ones placed last year didn’t work well. The new collars have functional GPS systems that give Game and Fish the ability to see day to day movements. The old ones were only giving off high frequency signals.

“(The new collars) will send out a couple points per day as the sheep move throughout the landscape,” Teal said. “We’ll collect the collars in a couple years. Then we’ll be able to download even more points and fill in the gaps of where they’ve been moving day to day.”

0120_sheep capture (3)Once the muggers captured the sheep, Game and Fish personnel and local residents brought the sheep to tables. There some Encampment students and Game and Fish employees took samples and fitted the animals with new collars.

The samples included blood samples, swabs from the nose and tonsils, fecal samples and an ultrasound to see if the ewes were pregnant.

The samples that Game and Fish gathered from the sheep will go to the agency’s veterinary lab. This is part of a statewide effort to gauge the health of the Wyoming’s bighorn sheep populations.

Game and Fish Wildlife Disease Supervisor Hank Edwards said the state wildlife agency can determine the health of the bighorn sheep with the samples.

“We’ll be sampling for pathogens known to cause pneumonia,” Hank said. “Pnemonia is a big deal in bighorn sheep.”

Game and Fish will also be able to compare herds that are healthy with those are not. From there they can try to determine differences in environment and any needs for ecological management.

Locally, Teal said Game and Fish will track the movements the sheep make to develop useful habitat improvement plans in the future.

“We’ll be able to know where we can better spend our money and our time enhancing habitat if we know exactly what parts of the landscape they’re using,” Teal said.

The state wildlife agency has been receiving help on the initiative from Encampment students. Jordan Seitz’s sixth and eighth grade classes got involved last February when Game and Fish captured the first five sheep.

The students have participated in observing the sheep as well.. The Game and Fish Laramie Region Newsletter states that the students took a field trip where the learned about bighorn sheep habitat, diets and digestion. Then they explored that habitat and learned about radio telemetry. At the end of the day they got to observe several bighorn sheep feeding near Miners Creek. Jordan said he hopes the experience inspires his students.

 

It’s cool that Jordan takes his classes out to help Game and Fish with this project. It shows the students that they can have a successful and awesome career in this state and in their hometown. Many students could enjoy a similar experience that opens their eyes to a fuller extent of what they can do after they graduate.

dsc_0260It’s been fun to take part in this effort myself for the past two years. I’ve gotten to touch the bighorn sheep to help hold them down while game and fish personnel gather samples. My first year at the capture Will Schultz, who was the game biologist at the time, asked if I wanted to touch the sheep and get my picture taken. Of course! Anybody who knows me won’t be surprised that I took my gloves off when holding the ewes so I could feel their soft fur.

If I had liked science more while in school and college, I may have become a game biologist. At least I get to sometimes live vicariously as one while being a news reporter.

 

Further Bighorn Sheep News

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department in partnership with the Wyoming Wild Sheep Foundation, the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center, and the University of Wyoming’s Ruckleshaus Institute is announcing a public engagement process to explore management concerns, issues, and opportunities for the Whiskey Mountain Bighorn Sheep herd.

A situation assessment was recently completed and dates for a series of public workshops and a “Bighorn Sheep Summit” have been set. Game and Fish encourages all those interested in this herd to attend the Summit. People will meet with bighorn sheep specialists from around the country to chart a path forward for this iconic bighorn sheep herd.

This herd has struggled to recover from a catastrophic all-age die-off caused by pneumonia in 1991. The disease caused an estimated 30% decline in the number of sheep. The herd continues to stay below the desired population size. This is because lamb survival is very low, likely due to the persistence of lamb pneumonia. At one time, there were an estimated 2,500 sheep in this population; today there are about 750.

“The bottom-line is, we simply don’t have all the answers how to turn this important bighorn sheep population around,” says Daryl Lutz, Lander’s wildlife management coordinator. “There is much to be learned how to best address this decline and perhaps implement management strategies and projects to attempt to arrest and reverse this trend,” says Lutz. “To do this, it is clear we must consider a different approach.”

All collaborative workshops will be held in Dubois at the Headwaters Arts and Conference Center (20 Stalnaker Street) from 6:00 pm- 9:00 pm each of the following evenings:

February 11 – Public workshop to summarize the situation assessment and exploration of issues.

March 14 – Bighorn Sheep Summit – discussion with “outside” experts about technical and scientific information regarding disease, predation, habitat and other aspects of this bighorn sheep herd.

April 3 – Public workshop to craft solutions to improve herd conditions.

June 5 – Public workshop to present draft strategy for public input, discussion, and refinement.

Getting lost in the forest

June 16, 2018. A day forever engraved in my mind; the day I got lost in the Medicine Bow National Forest. My feet traveled more trails in the forest than the average person. I spent the previous summer hiking the quiet, less-trodden paths. But I never hiked the backside of Medicine Bow Peak. From pictures it looked less crowded than the main trail and on June 16th my soul needed an adventure.

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Mistake #1: My weekends filled up with part-time work at the Chamber of Commerce office serving tourists. I answered their questions on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. I got off work on June 16th at 3 p.m. I’ve been in the mountains in the late afternoon in the past. Many times I cut my trips short or peeled a soaking wet sweater off afterward. I headed to the mountains anyway.

When I got to the Lake Marie parking lot several people headed back to their cars after a day of recreating. I spotted others around the lake as they continued fishing.

I grabbed my trekking poles, threw my sweater and some snack bars into my pack and started up the trail head.

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Mistake #2: Not far into my hike, snow covered the trail. I post holed through the first section of snow, but once I got through no path alpine grasses and mud sat underneath my feet. I looked across the horizon line, found a cairn and hiked my way to it. A burst of confidence surged through me once back on the trail and in good in hands. I continued up along the backside of the Snowy Range and again found snow covering the trail. I scoped out the next cairn and walked around the snow. I did this one more time until I looked upon my destination. A light gray cloud hid Medicine Bow Peak.

 

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Mistake #3: I’ve hiked in the rain before, so I continued. Until I saw lightening. It flashed like lightning, but I didn’t actually see a bolt. Not ready to die, I turned around. Except the path no longer existed. Snow blinded me. Not a single cairn emerged from the drifts. My footprints couldn’t be seen because I had stayed on top of the snow most of the way up. I came from the west, so I headed back in that direction.

 

And that’s where the real adventure began. I scrambled down and around jagged rocks hoping to see the Lake Marie Parking lot and my car. My knees rammed into the wet slabs of granite as I slipped and fell many times.

Finally I saw a pair of lakes. But it didn’t look like Lake Marie, Mirror Lake or Lookout Lake. I slid to the bottom of the hillside and walked around the bank of the lakes. The landscape didn’t offer anything familiar.

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After looking up how far I was from my car two days prior to posting this, I discovered I was 9,374 feet from where I parked my car.

I saw footprints around the bank of the lake even though drifts of snow at least two feet deep bordered the water. I made my way around the bank in the direction the footprints appeared to be heading. Halfway to the other side of the lake the footprints disappeared until I came to a dirt road. The footprints returned and I followed them down the road.

What sun remained sunk behind the mountains as storm clouds continued to roll in. I left the house at 9 in the morning. I sat in my car parked at the gas station at about 3 p.m. when I sent the last text of the day to my boyfriend detailing my plans. He might be wondering why my four hour hike lasted much longer.

My phone bounced from one to two bars as I searched my contacts for my boyfriend’s name. He answered.

The first words out of my mouth, “Okay don’t be mad or scared, but I’m lost.”

We did the best we could over a phone with hardly any signal to determine my location. I describe the road I stood on though I couldn’t tell him its name or where it started or ended. I promised I’d follow it down to the highway. His plan consisted of driving up and down the highway until he found me. Then my phone died.

As I continued the road became impassable with water gushing through a cut in the dirt path and roaring down into the dark abyss.

Throughout my hike I stayed on higher ground west of the highway. I decided to follow the fast-flowing stream downhill.

I tripped and fell over tree branches and rocks as I meandered around the water and down the hill. Once it got too dark for me to see the water from a safe distance from the bank. I quit walking. I found a fallen log and dug underneath it with my hands and pocket knife until I made a hole big enough for me to fit.

My sweater clung to my body but didn’t offer any warmth, so I took it off and draped it over the log. I pulled a long sleeve shirt out of my backpack to replace the sweater. I ate half of a bar and pulled my sweater back around myself as my teeth chattered.

I wondered if my boyfriend called the county sheriff’s office. I heard the beating a helicopter rotor. A spotlight scanned the forest. Each time I heard the helicopter it sounded like it would hover away before coming back. Later I learned that search and rescue didn’t come out during the night. They followed direction to wait until the sun came up the next day, so I didn’t actually hear or see anything.

 

I slept for some period of time even though I shivered all night. When the sun came up I felt wide awake. I scrambled out from underneath the log I lived under until morning. I continued following the water down the hill. In the distance I saw a culvert. Water goes through culverts to avoid washing out a ROAD! I’ve never been happier in my life to see a culvert.

I hopped onto the road and started walking one way. Then I second guessed myself and headed the other direction. When I came to a “No Trespassing” sign I turned around and followed my first instinct.

I turned around and headed back the way I started. I passed a vacant truck and then came upon a second where I saw a couple packing up.

“Excuse me sir,” I said to the man loading something into the back. When he looked up I asked, “Do you know how far I am from the highway?”

“Not too far if you keep going the way you’re headed,” He replied. “Are you lost?”

Not anymore. While I didn’t know my exact location I could find my way to the highway and follow it to my car. I explained I got lost while hiking.

“How long have you been lost?” his wife asked with concern.

“Since last night.”

Getting ready to leave their campsite, the couple said they would drive me to my car after they finished packing up their gear. My car looked inviting, sitting and waiting for me at the Lake Marie parking area. The parking lot, filled with vehicles the afternoon before, sat empty with only one truck with my car.

Once I got inside my car I took off my sweater, now dirty, cold and wet. I plugged my phone into the car charger and pulled on my winter coat. I thanked myself for leaving the jacket in the backseat even though the weather at home didn’t call for it anymore.

As I drove down the highway off the mountain toward home, I saw search and rescue vehicles headed up.

“Damn, that’s for me.” I mumbled. Tears welled in my eyes with mixed emotions. People out there care about me. If my brother never bothered to teach me survival skills, the service these guys provided would become essential to my life.

I drove to where the highway turns off and parked off to the side. I turned my phone on and saw a text from a woman who works dispatch for the county sheriff’s office asking me to call. I obeyed and told her my location. She told me a deputy would meet with me to make sure I didn’t need medical attention and to take a statement.

The search and rescue crew came first. They all checked in on me asking if I planned to report on my incident for the radio newscast on Monday. Famous in a small town. Soon the deputy arrived. He asked me if I needed care, if I ate and drank enough food and water while lost and if I could drive home. After assuring him a warm house and a nap would cure me, the deputy sent me home.

I got home and hugged my boyfriend. After I recounted the brief version of the story, I took a hot shower and slept for a few hours.

 

Press release from the Sheriff’s Office:

my press release

Were you scared? I heard this question many times for the next month. I can honestly say no. I didn’t allow myself to get scared. My anxiety tried to take hold of me a few times, but I reminded myself that being scared wouldn’t help my situation. I needed to use my head to get through.

Each time anxiety tried to creep in, I took a moment to pray. A calmness washed over me and I trusted myself to move forward.

 

I hope somebody can learn something from my “adventure.” You can know the right steps to take in any situation and still make mistakes. Sometimes you let your desires and your confidence overtake your common sense. The tools to make the right decisions were in my brain, but I let my wish to hike the backside of Medicine Bow Peak intervene and take control.

There are a few items I wish I would have had with me now that I’ve experienced being lost in the forest. Most of the items are things I can easily store in my backpack and will become some of my essential items. One of those items is a space blanket to help me stay warm. I also keep my winter coat in my pack these days. I additionally have a backpacking stove and matches that I intend to keep in my pack for my adventures.

Most importantly, I always bring a GPS with me now. I have an app on my phone called Avenza Maps that works great! (Not sponsored) I’m obsessed with it and will have a blog post later about how great it is. It’s a free map app with a library of almost any map you could think of. Sometimes the maps cost money, but I haven’t seen any that are over $5. And you safety is worth more than that. Today I have three maps that cover the area where I was misplaced.

 

My last message for you is to donate to your local search and rescue! I’m truly grateful for the team we have here in Carbon County. Also thanks to the couple who brought me back to my car!

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Picture from before I got lost

Hiking with strangers (who later become friends)

Disclaimer: This post is in no way sponsored or affiliated with Mountain Chicks or Women Who Hike. All views expressed on this site are my own and do not represent the opinions of any entity whatsoever with which I have been, am now, or will be affiliated.

 

Meeting up with people you’ve never met before may sound intimidating. I’d be lying if I said the first time I did it, I wasn’t nervous. But I was also super excited.
 
I started meeting up with strangers to go hiking about a year after moving to Wyoming. My first summer I spent a lot of time hiking with my boyfriend. However, he’s more into fishing than hitting the trails and is often busy on weekends. I have a few friends I like to hike with as well, but they’re not always available when I am. I needed to find others with the same interest to join me when I didn’t want to go alone.
 
My first meet up
med bow peak gretchen
 
The first time I met up with a stranger, it was through the Mountain Chicks Wyoming chapter. The ambassador at the time, Gretchen, was hosting a group hike at Medicine Bow Peak. She and I were the only ones who showed up for the hike. We met at the pay station at the Sugarloaf access. As I was paying she rolled down her window and asked if I was Emma. Sure enough, I was!
 
We drove to the trailhead, parked and waited a couple minutes to see if anybody else was going to show up. Nobody did and we started our hike.
 
It was fun to meet somebody else who was passionate about the outdoors and looking to explore Wyoming. We were both Midwest transplants who had been in the state for about a year and a half. Not only did I learn a lot about Gretchen, but I learned some valuable skills.
 
One is be prepared. (I learn this one through many experiences.) Somehow I forgot to bring snacks for the hike. Luckily, Gretchen had enough snacks to save the day.
 
The second thing I learned is to know when to speak up for your well-being. We started hiking at a brisk pace. As we got higher up the mountain, I couldn’t keep up the speed. At first I thought I needed to keep up. When I mentioned I was getting winded, Gretchen was more than willing to slow the pace to one that was more comfortable for both of us.
 
Cirque of the Towers
The next time I met up with strangers to go hiking, I drove about four hours to go backpacking with 13 other women. This was through Women Who Hike Wyoming. I hadn’t met any of the women besides having Facebook communication with Ambassador Ali.
 
cirque of the towers
After introductions and reminders on the Leave No Trace principles, we began the hike. I enjoyed getting to know the other women as we trekked the 12 miles to our campsite. Again I learned how important it is for me to prepare for the type of trip I’m taking. I wasn’t wearing the right shoes. I also didn’t have the right tools to heat my meals well.
 
The most important thing I learned about was community. Other women on the trip noted that I was having issues heating up my meal and offered their Jetboils.
 
Community was also found on the trail. A group of us had to hold up as one woman was fighting her blood sugar and other was getting used to the elevation. The rest of us needed to catch our breaths. The women who were doing fine checked to make sure we could continue on the trail, so that no one fell behind.
 
The communal experience at the campfire was also great. We shared stories while passing around the whiskey, gin and whatever else was on hand.
 
That strong community followed the next day when we hiked to the Cirque of the Towers. Some moments of the hike were grueling, but with the support of each other and a sharing of groans, we made it to the beautiful view.
 
Curt Gowdy State Park
curt gowdy
Women Who Hike brought me to my next hike with strangers, as well. On the Wyoming Facebook group, one of the women asked for people familiar with the Medicine Bow National Forest area. With my great love for the forest I chimed in. Four of us (plus one dog) made a plan to hike at Curt Gowdy State Park, which isn’t exactly in the forest but borders it.
 
I enjoyed that hike as well and made three more new friends. While we haven’t pinned anything down yet, we agreed we’d like to hike together again soon.
 
Spearfish Canyon
spearfish canyon
Photo credit: Elisabeth Brentano
My last meet-up was with the South Dakota Women Who Hike group. I drove five hours to Spearfish Canyon for this experience. I met the South Dakota ambassador, Stephanie and Women Who Hike Founder Nicole Brown.
 
I met several other awesome women who took part in the hike. There were 40+ of us!
 
We hiked two miles in on the Iron Creek trail into the Spearfish Canyon’s winter wonderland. When we returned we hike another half miles to Spearfish Falls.
 
A Merrell representative was also there. She provided boots for people to try out on the trail. Everyone also got a free mug at the end of the event and two people won a free pair of boots.
 
I will do more of these meet-up hikes in the future. It’s my goal to get to Texas and hang out with Ambassador Mallory on one of her ventures.
If you want to meet up with strangers to go hiking, get involved in a group. It’s a safe way to make new friends and bust out the hiking boots. I also recommend meeting up with more than one other person. With another set of eyes it’s harder for anybody to try to do anything fishy.
I also like to check out the person I’m going to be hiking with on Facebook. You can usually tell from a brief review of their profile how serious they are about hiking and their skill level. It also makes the meet-up less awkward because you can bring up something you saw on their profile and start a conversation.

My Goals for 2019

I don’t typically take part in New Year’s Resolutions because you shouldn’t limit yourself to a new year to make changes in your life. If you discover an area where you need to grow on December 23rd, you should start on December 23rd. There’s no reason to wait.

Having goals, is different. Year-long goals are a good measure of what you want to do in 365 days. You can also have shorter or longer term goals, like three month goals or 10 year goals.

 

I’m using the SMART Goals guideline to outline the things I want to do this year.

Specific – What exactly will you do?

Measurable – How will you know if you meet your goal?

Achievable – What steps are you going to take to reach your goal?

Relevant – What about your goal makes it important to you?

Timely – When do you want to complete your goal?

 

I’ve decided to share my goals with you, so you can all hold me accountable. I plan to provide you with updates with my accomplishments. My hope is also that these goals will inspire you to develop some plans for 2019 as well.

 

Goal 1: Go on my first solo backpacking trip

I plan to go to Adobe Town Wilderness Study Area in Sweetwater County to complete this goal. I went there with my best friend for my birthday last year. I loved the landscape and saw some even cooler looking landscape off in the distance. We were car camping, so the far off land wasn’t accessible. I plan to park my vehicle at the end of the dirt road. From there I’ll hike south and backpack in Monument Valley.

adobe town

I plan to get a one person backpacking tent to make traveling easier. About a month before my trip I’ll take my backpack out on the trail,  getting to the weight I’ll need for the trip. I will complete my goal this spring or summer.

 

Goal 2: Take a Wilderness First Aid course

Because I spend a lot of time in the outdoors, it’s important that I take the NOLS wilderness first aid course. Plus, I’m planning on getting involved in a program that requires this course (can’t reveal what it is yet). I plan to take the course in April.

 

Goal 3: Catch a fish on a fly rod

I got a fly rod last summer, but never caught a fish. It’s hard! I’ll try to get out to one of the many lakes around me or to the North Platte or Encampment River at least once a week. I’ll also let my boyfriend teach me more techniques that may help me. I want to complete this goal by July.

fly fishing

 

Goal 4: Updating this blog twice a week

I plan to update this blog with a weekly update on what’s happening to lands and conservation in Wyoming and US. I also want to publish posts that are a little more fun, like this one, on a weekly basis. Doing this helps me to connect and share what’s happening in Wyoming. I’m also invested in the lands in this state and want Wyoming’s quietness to have a louder voice when it needs protection. I’ve already planned and written five other blog posts to get me started. As the year progresses I’ll continue writing and paying attention to the news around me.

 

Goal 5: Backpack the Encampment River Trail

I love this trail. It is my absolute favorite! But I’ve never hiked the whole 15 miles. I plan to change that this summer. I’ll do this with a group. I’ll prepare myself for this hike the same way I’ll prepare for backpacking in the Adobe Town Wilderness Study Area.

encampment river

 

Goal 6: Hike a new trail in the Medicine Bow National Forest.

Two summers ago I worked hard to hike as many trails as possible in the Medicine Bow National Forest. While I knocked a few off my list and discovered some new favorites, I have several trails left to wander. I have a few trails in mind that I’d like to tackle. One is the trail to Medicine Bow Peak from Dipper Lake. It’s the least common route to the top, and the only one I haven’t done. I’m also interested in the Medicine Bow Rail Trail.

mbnf

I have a guide book that is specific to the Medicine Bow National Forest, so I’ll use it to plan my adventures. These trips will take place sometime between July and September.

 

Longer term goals

One of my lifetime goals is to travel to every National Park in the United States. So far I’ve visited Yellowstone, Grand Teton and the Badlands National Parks. I have a long ways to go. I’m hoping to be able to visit Voyageurs National Park in August, but I’m not sure I’ll make it there this year. I don’t currently have a timeline of when I’d like to do this, but I would like to complete it by the age of 50.

Another lifetime goal is to hike to the highest point in every state. This one will be a bit harder because to do so, you have to figure out how to get through private property. To date I’ve only made it to the highest point in South Dakota, which is Black Elk Peak.

I have another highest peak goal, which is to get to the highest point in every county in Wyoming. Wyoming has a total of 23 counties, and I believe I’ve made it to the highest point in one. There’s some debate over what is the highest peak in Albany County. I’ve heard it’s either Medicine Bow Peak or Laramie Peak. The guidebook I have says Medicine Bow Peak has about mile of elevation on Laramie Peak. If anybody knows which is higher for sure, let me know! Medicine Bow Peak is 12,013 feet in elevation, for reference. I might make it to Bridger Peak this summer, which is the highest point in Carbon County at 10,950 feet.

 

What are your goals, short or long term?