Weekly Review: January 25th

Wildlife habitat conserved in Wyoming

A family in southeast Wyoming teamed up with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to protect 133 acres of important elk habitat.

Fred and Stephanie Lindzey cherish the wildlife values of their land, which their family has owned for more than three decades.

The property is about 20 miles west of Laramie and east of the Snowy Range Mountains on the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest. It features high quality wildlife and riparian habitat along the Little Laramie River and is part of the Snowy Range Scenic Byway. It also provides critical linkage between several nearby completed and developing conservation projects. These are all located within the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s Sheep Mountain Mule Deer Initiative Area.

The Lindzey’s Home Ranch Conservation Easement protects winter and year-round range for elk. It also provides a home for moose, mule deer and antelope. The property also serves as historic range for a wide array of nongame fish, bird and animal species, including golden eagles. The landowners cooperate with wildlife agencies and nonprofit organizations on habitat research. They also host a bird banding site for the Audubon Society on the property.

Funding partners for the project included the Wyoming Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the Wyoming Wildlife Foundation. The Lindzey family also made a generous donation.

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation works with willing landowners to establish conservation easements. These protect crucial elk winter and summer ranges, migration corridors and calving grounds.

Since 1986, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and its partners protected or enhanced 1,131,711 acres of habitat in Wyoming. They’ve protected more than 7.4 million acres nationwide.

 

Major reservoir in Colorado heating up at fast pace

The surface temperature at a major reservoir in Colorado has risen 5 degrees over a 35 year period. That’s according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Lake Dillon is a significant source for Denver’s water supply. So researchers at CU Boulder took on the task in the early 80s to study the water quality. William Lewis is a professor at CU Boulder and lead author on the study.

He said the fact that the lake is warming is not surprising, but the rate of warming is.

Lewis said despite the changing temperatures, there weren’t any signs of ecological damage to the reservoir. The researchers think there’s a reason for that. The lake sits at an altitude of about 9,000 feet so the water is very cold, to begin with.

 

Volunteer to help habitat

game and fish volunteer
Photo from Wyoming Game and Fish

On Saturday, February 9, Wyoming Game and Fish invites volunteers to help improve fish habitat in Ocean Lake, near Pavillion, WY. The project provides an opportunity to recycle Christmas trees while improving the structure of the lake. Fresh Christmas trees are being accepted for free at the Lander and Dubois Landfill and Riverton Transfer Station through Wed, Jan. 30.

At Ocean Lake, volunteers and staff will wire the trees together and attach concrete blocks to weigh them down. When the ice melts in the spring, the weighted trees will sink and provide structure for fish. The resulting formation creates the inland version of an artificial reef.

Volunteers have taken part in this project for several years to help increase fish habitat at Ocean Lake.”

Volunteers should meet at the boat landing on Long Point of Ocean Lake at 9 am, and bring pliers or wire cutters, work gloves and warm clothes. Volunteers are welcome to show up for any part of the time. Game and Fish plans to complete the project early in the afternoon.

Partners who donated supplies, put forward effort, and gave of their time include Fremont County Solid Waste Disposal District, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, North Platte Walleyes Unlimited, Wyoming Demolition, Drake’s Landscaping, Geotec, Brian Woodard of Rocky Mountain Discount Sports in Casper, and the volunteers who attend each year.

 

Popo Agie Gold Art and Science Project.

At Lander Arts and Sciences has a new project entitled Popo Agie Gold. This project seeks to raise awareness of water use in and around the Popo Agie River and to celebrate the Lander area watershed. The organization planned many discrete events over the next year to engage the community.

One event at the Lander Library on January 31 at 7:00 pm is the Story Deluge: Whiskey is for Drinking and Water for Fighting Over.  The event will highlight the humorous, poignant and personal stories of Rob Hellyer, Jason Baldes, Del McOmie, Lynn McRanns, Mike Dabich, George Hunker and others. Limited seating is available. Tickets are $12. Proceeds benefit the local Healthy Rivers Initiative water conservation projects.

A second upcoming event is a Photographic Exhibit: For the Love of Water: A History of Our Use. I’m going to try to make it to this one. The event opens on Feb 16 from 4:00 – 6:00 pm at the Lander Pioneer Museum. The exhibit features historic photos and artifacts that show how people use the water in Fremont County from the late 1800’s to present day.  It will explore the agricultural, recreational and industrial use of water in the area.

 

Game and Fish Commission supports sage grouse populations through translocation

The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission held its January meeting in Cheyenne this week. The volunteer board voted on several topics and had other discussions related to Wyoming’s fish and wildlife.

The commission voted to continue the translocation study of Wyoming greater sage grouse to North Dakota. The study has been underway for two years. It helps develop a range-wide protocol for translocating sage grouse. It will also help maintain the interconnected populations throughout the region. Wyoming is a stronghold for sage grouse and a source to help bolster populations. The translocation study will be evaluated on an annual basis dependent on impacts to the source population. In return, North Dakota will provide Wyoming with 200 pheasants.

 

Wyoming Governor appointments that deal with lands and conservation

Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources

Darin Westby has been the director of the Wyoming Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources since August 2016. Westby has over 24 years of experience in the environmental, architectural, engineering, construction and management fields. This includes twenty years in State employment and seventeen years with the agency. He has a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wyoming. He also has a Civil Professional Engineering license, and a certificate in public management.

 

Wyoming State Geological Survey

Erin Campbell has served as the State Geologist and director of the State Geological Survey since appointed to the position in 2017. She has also worked at WSGS as the Manager of Energy and Minerals Resources. She is the first woman named Wyoming State Geologist. Campbell has a B.A. in Geology from Occidental College in Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Wyoming. She also has experience working for Chevron and as a lecturer at UW.

 

Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality

Todd Parfitt has served as the DEQ director since 2012. He has over 30 years of experience in the environmental field, including 25 years with the DEQ. Before becoming the director, Parfitt spent seven years as the DEQ Deputy Director and as the Administrator of DEQ’s Industrial Siting Division. Parfitt has a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources, Fisheries Management. He additionally has a master’s degree in Public Administration with an emphasis in Environmental Policy. Both degrees are from The Ohio State University. He is a 2008 graduate of Leadership Wyoming and was the President of the Environmental Council of the States in 2017-2018.

 

Wyoming Department of Agriculture

Doug Miyamoto has served as director of the Department of Agriculture since 2015. He was recently elected President of the Western United States Agriculture Trade Association. Before becoming director, Miyamoto served as the Executive Director and deputy director of the Wyoming Livestock Board. Miyamoto earned a Master’s Degree in Rangeland Ecology and a Bachelor’s Degree in Range Management. The degrees are both from the University of Wyoming. He has served as chairman of the Natural Resource and Environment Committee of the National Association of Conservation Districts of Agriculture since 2016.

 

My upcoming adventures:

I have friends from college visiting this weekend. We’re going to the Snowy Range Ski Lodge to see if we can remember how to ski down mountains. We might have to resort to snowshoes instead!